Our Gastroenterology Blog

Posts for tag: Ulcerative Colitis

By Ocean Family Gastroenterology
November 07, 2019
Category: Gastroenterology
Tags: Ulcerative Colitis  

Ulcerative colitis is a form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that causes inflammation and ulcers within the lining of the colon (aka: the large intestines) and the rectum. Symptoms are usually subtle at first but get progressively worse. Common symptoms of ulcerative colitis include:

  • Bloody diarrhea
  • Abdominal pain
  • Rectal bleeding and pain
  • Unexpected weight loss
  • Fatigue
  • The inability to defecate

While symptoms are usually mild or moderate, some patients deal with severe and debilitating symptoms. With UC, it is possible to have flare-ups with bouts of remission. If you are noticing regular chances to your bowels or any of the symptoms above it’s important that you turn to a gastroenterologist for a proper evaluation. Untreated ulcerative colitis can cause issues and potentially serious complications.

If your gastroenterologist has diagnosed you with ulcerative colitis you may be wondering what your treatment options are. The treatment plan that your doctor creates for you will depend on the type and severity of your symptoms. Your doctor can help you manage your symptoms effectively to make living with this chronic digestive problem easier.

Treatment for ulcerative colitis usually includes a combination of lifestyle changes and prescription medications. Lifestyle modifications that can help ease and reduce symptoms include:

  • Regular exercise
  • Staying hydrated
  • Proper sleep and rest
  • Avoiding fatty, greasy foods and opting for easier-to-digest foods
  • Avoiding over-the-counter antidiarrheal medications (as regular use can lead to complications)
  • Finding ways to effectively manage stress
  • Turning to a counselor, therapist or support group
  • Avoiding smoking, alcohol, caffeine, and other foods and drinks that could trigger symptoms

There are several medications that may be used to treat ulcerative colitis symptoms. Common ulcerative colitis medications include:

5-ASA: this is the most commonly used medication for treating UC

Corticosteroids: often used for moderate to severe cases of US

Immunomodulator medications: used to reduce inflammation

Biologics: used to reduce inflammation by targeting a specific protein produced by the immune system

The only way to get rid of ulcerative colitis is surgery to remove the colon; however, surgery usually isn’t recommended unless medications and other nonsurgical treatment options cannot properly control ulcers and inflammation. If there is a bleed or tear within the colon this may also warrant surgery.

Are you experiencing symptoms of ulcerative colitis? Want to discuss your treatment options with a doctor who understands what you’re going through? If you said “yes” then it’s time to turn to a gastroenterologist for the specialized care you need.

By Ocean Family Gastroenterology
July 16, 2018
Category: GI Care
Tags: Ulcerative Colitis  

Ulcerative colitis is a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that causes severe and even bloody diarrhea that can result in abdominal pain and unexpected weight loss. While people have probably heard about Crohn’s disease more often than they have ulcerative colitis, this condition actually affects as many as 907,000 of the 1.6 million Americans living with IBD.

While ulcerative colitis can happen to anyone, a gastroenterologist most often diagnoses it during a person’s later teen years or by early adulthood. While there is no definitive cause of ulcerative colitis, a family history of this condition can certainly increase your chances of developing this chronic GI problem.

Those with ulcerative colitis experience diarrhea, which can be bloody at times. Some patients may experience rectal pain, occasional constipation, abdominal discomfort, fever, or weight loss. In order to diagnose this gastrointestinal issue, a GI specialist will often need to perform imaging tests such as a CT scan or run an endoscopy to check the health of the gastrointestinal tract and to look for signs of ulcerative colitis.

While there is currently no cure for this condition, there are certainly an array of medications and treatment options available to help you keep your symptoms and flare-ups in check. The type of treatment plan that your GI doctor will create for you will depend on the type and severity of your symptoms.

The main goals of treating ulcerative colitis are to reduce inflammation within the colon while also speeding up the remission process and making sure that your symptoms stay in remission for as long as possible. Of course, it is still possible, even with the right medication, to experience symptoms.

Common medications for treating ulcerative colitis include:

  • Antibiotics: to target any infections within the GI tract
  • Aminosalicylates: to treat mild to moderate inflammation within the colon
  • Corticosteroids: for short-term treatment of moderate to severe symptoms
  • Biologics: to target a specific protein, which leads to inflammation

Sometimes, over-the-counter medications and supplements may be used in conjunction with prescription medications. These may include vitamins and nutritional supplements, pain medications and antidiarrheal. If your ulcerative colitis doesn’t respond to these medications then you’ll want to discuss the benefits with your gastroenterologist of getting surgery to remove parts of the colon or rectum to alleviate severe or persistent symptoms.

By Ocean Family Gastroenterology
November 01, 2017
Category: GI Condition
Tags: Ulcerative Colitis  

Ulcerative colitis, a type of inflammatory bowel disease, causes painful open sores in your large intestine and rectum. The disease can affect both children and adults. Although there is currently no cure for ulcerative colitis, symptoms can be managed with medications and dietary changes in many cases.

What are the symptoms of ulcerative colitis?

Although symptoms of ulcerative colitis vary depending on the severity of the disease, diarrhea that contains blood or pus is a frequent problem. It may be difficult to get the bathroom in time, particularly if a bout of diarrhea strikes in the middle of the night. Other symptoms can include:

  • Nausea
  • Constipation
  • Abdominal cramping and pain
  • Fever
  • Joint pain
  • Dehydration
  • Weight loss
  • Canker sores
  • Anemia
  • Rectal pain
  • Fatigue
  • Difficulty defecating

If you have severe ulcerative colitis, you may be more likely to develop one or more serious complications, such as severe dehydration or bleeding, a perforated colon, osteoporosis, megacolon, blood clots or colon cancer.

What are the risk factors for ulcerative colitis?

Ulcerative colitis symptoms usually appear between the ages of 15 and 35. You're more likely to develop ulcerative colitis if other people in your family have it. Your ancestry may also affect your risk. Caucasians and people of Ashkenazi Jewish descent get the disease more often than other ethnic groups.

How is ulcerative colitis treated?

Medications that relieve inflammation and suppress your immune system can be helpful if you have ulcerative colitis. Corticosteroids may also reduce inflammation and bring about a remission of symptoms. Because prolonged use of corticosteroids can cause high blood pressure, diabetes and osteoporosis, they're only recommended for short-term use. Anti-diarrheal medications can reduce the frequency of diarrhea, while iron supplements may prevent anemia caused by bleeding.

Approximately 25 to 40 percent of people who have ulcerative colitis will eventually need surgery to remove the colon, according to the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation. In some cases, your surgeon may be able to connect to your small intestine to your anus, which will allow you to defecate normally. If that's not possible, a bag attached to the abdomen will be used to collect stool.

Ulcerative colitis is a serious inflammatory bowel disease, but it's symptoms can often be managed with medication, dietary changes and stress relief techniques, allowing you to live a fairly normal life.



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